MONITORING MUONS ON THE SURFACE OF THE EARTH

DATA TABLE, ANALYSIS, AND SUGGESTIONS FOR MORE RESEARCH

(The notes and data from the graph data page are placed in one place for your convenience before the start of the data table and analysis.)

 

NOTES

a) All graphs are calibrated in elapsed hour periods (unless indicated as 2 hour periods) and in counts per time unit.

b) All hour graphs start with Start Time + 1 Hour.

c) All 2 hour graphs start with Start Time + 2 Hours.

d) Average Counts (Av.) are averages per minute and should be multiplied by 60 for one hour and 120 for the 2 hour graphs.

e) The counts are close to micro-roentgens/hour for RM-60 Geiger Counter - the 105 conversion factor in the aw-graph program is set at 100 which nullifies any conversion.

f) EDT is GMT - 4 Hours.

g) All the data was collected between 7/2/01 and 7/19/01 in PA in the area of 40 deg.lat. and -75 deg.long.

h) Degrees (deg.) indicate the direction of the 2 Geiger Counters, 90 deg. is straight up, 0 deg, is sideways in the indicated 2 directions, other deg. values indicate the angle above the horizon in the indicated direction.

i) The menu items on the large images are not clickable.

 

DATA

01) 7/2/01, Start 10:45 PM EDT, Av.= 1.19, Peaks at 3:45 AM = 1.32, 5:45 AM = 1.34, 8:45 AM = 1.28, 90 deg.

02) 7/3/01, Start 10:45 PM EDT, Av = 1.22, Peak at 5:45 AM = 1.22, 90 deg.

03) 7/4/01, Start 10:45 PM EDT, Av. = 0.12, Peak at 2:45 AM = 0.17, E/W, 0 deg.

04) 7/5/01, Start at 10:45 PM EDT, Av. = 0.10, Peaks at 3:45 AM = 0.21, 8:45 AM = 0.20, E/W, 0 deg.

05) 7/6/01, Start at 9 PM EDT, Av.= 0.37, Peak at 4 AM = 0.50, S, 40 deg.

06) 7/6/01, Start at 9 PM EDT (same as # 05 but 2 hour periods), Peak at 5 AM = 0.42

07) 7/7/01, Start at 8 PM EDT, Av. = 0.36, Peaks at 12 AM = 0.43, 2 AM = 0.45, 4 AM = 0.40, 6 AM = 0.42, S, 40 deg.

08) 7/7/01, Start at 8 PM EDT (same as # 07 but 2 hour periods), Peak at 2 AM = 0.42

09) 7/8/01, Start at 8 PM EDT, Av. = 0.12, Peaks at 12 AM = 0.23, 2 AM = 0.16, 6 AM = 0.16, N/S, 0 deg.

10) 7/8/01, Start at 8 PM EDT (same as # 09 but 2 hour periods), Peaks at 12 AM = 0.16, 2 AM = 0.15

11) 7/9/01, Start at 8 PM EDT, Av. = 0.14, Peaks at 9 PM = 0.25, 12 PM = 0.16, 4 AM = 0.16, 6 AM = 0.16, N/S, 0 deg.

12) 7/9/01, Start at 8 PM EDT (same as # 11 but 2 hour periods), Peak at 10 PM = 0.20

13) 7/10/01, Start at 8 PM EDT, Av. = 0.23, Peak at 1 AM = 0.40, S, 20 deg.

14) 7/10/01, Start at 8 PM EDT (same as # 13 but 2 hour periods), Peak at 2 AM = 0.32

15) 7/11/01, Start at 8 PM EDT, Av.= 0.30, Peaks at 12 AM = 0.40, 5 AM = 0.35, S, 20 deg.

16) 7/11/01, Start at 8 PM EDT (same as # 15 but 2 hour periods), Peaks at 12 AM = 0.34, 6 AM = 0.33

17) 7/12/01, Start at 5 PM EDT, Av. = 0.21, Peaks at 8 PM = 0.27, 2 AM = 0.30, 6 AM = 0.30, 9 AM = 0.30, 2 PM = 0.28, 4 PM = 0.30, S, 20 deg.

18) 7/16/01, 5 PM EDT, Av. = 1.20, Peaks at 11 PM = 1.42, 4 AM = 1.41, 5 AM = 1.42, 2 PM = 1.34, 90 deg.

19) 7/18/01, Start 5 PM, Av. = 14.05 (one geiger counter, no c-box, background count of all radiation for 24 hours), Peak at 5 AM = 14.7


DATA TABLE

TIME (EDT)
ALL HITS
90 DEG.
0 DEG. N/S
0 DEG. E/W
40 DEG. S
20 DEG. S
12 AM
4
-
2
-
1
1
1 AM
1
-
-
-
-
1
2 AM
3
-
1
-
1
1
3 AM
1
-
-
1
-
-
4 AM
6
2
1
1
2
-
5 AM
3
1
-
-
1
1
6 AM
6
2
2
-
1
1
7 AM
-
-
-
-
-
-
8 AM
-
-
-
-
-
-
9 AM
3
1
-
1
-
1
10 AM
-
-
-
-
-
-
11 AM
-
-
-
-
-
-
12 PM
-
-
-
-
-
-
1 PM
-
-
-
-
-
-
2 PM
2
1
-
-
-
1
3 PM
-
-
-
-
-
-
4 PM
1
-
-
-
-
1
5 PM
-
-
-
-
-
-
6 PM
-
-
-
-
-
-
7 PM
-
-
-
-
-
-
8 PM
1
-
-
-
-
1
9 PM
1
-
1
-
-
-
10 PM
-
-
-
-
-
-
11 PM
1
1
-
-
-
-


ANALYSIS

     Most of the data was collected during the time period of around 5 PM to 9 AM. The frequency of the hits is more pronounced during that time period. The other times were included for comparisons and for the convenience of data collection. The 20 degree south readings were included because the strong radio source at the center of the Milky Way (Sagittarius A) reaches it maximum altitude of around 20 degrees in the southern direction at around 11 PM EDT during the times of the data collections.

     This data indicates that significant peaks occur more often in the time periods of 11 PM to 1 AM and 4 AM to 6 AM. There were 6 hits during the 11 PM to 1 AM perod and 15 hits during the 4 AM to 6 AM period. Perhaps the 11 PM to 1 AM hits have something to do with the center of the Milky Way and the 4 AM to 6 AM hits have something to do with the increase in the muon count before sunrise.

     Hopefully, others will join me in this research in progress (RIP according to Gordon Kane in his book, "Supersymmetry"). I am already gathering more data in the time period including the center of the Milky Way at the 20 degree southern direction PA and the 40 degree southern direction in the VI. One large factor in this research is the magnetic fields surrounding the earth and their effect on the directions of the muon sources. The location on the surface of the earth may be another factor. Also the cosmic events that trigger the primary cosmic radiation may not be constant and may depend on solar activity or happenings in or galaxy of some distant galaxy. But I think that the evidence shows that there are significant increases in the muon count on the surface of the earth at certain times and I think that the coincidence box used with the 2 geiger counters can achieve significant results in showing the direction of the source of the muon particles.


SUGGESTIONS FOR MORE RESEARCH

1) Make the observations for 24 hour periods for a greater number of days.

2) Observe the variation in the average muon count rate over many different angles and directions.

3) Observe the variation of the average muon count rate at different locations and relate them to the J.F. Ziegler article muon count rate variations at different locations.

4) Relate the muon count peaks to solar activity.

5) Increase the spacing between the geiger counters and relate it to the change in the muon count rate in different directions. Determine if the increased spacing increases directionality.

6) Use more geiger counter pairs to increase the significance of the muon count at shorter time intervals.

7) Determine if the earth's rotation has an effect on the arrival time of the muon count peaks.

8) Determine if there is a relationship between air pressure or temperature with the size of the average muon flux.

9) Observe if there is any change in the average muon flux by placing lead bricks in front of the geiger counters.

10) Confirm that the average muon flux does not change when lead bricks are place below the geiger counters.

11) Determine the variation in the average muon flux by placing the geiger counters at different levels below the surface of the earth.

12) Place two or more pairs of geiger counters and coincidence detectors at different locations and determine if the peaks on the graphs happen at the same time.


 

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